revolutionary tools.  groundbreaking articles.  proven results.

Searching for the Next Miles Austin: The 30 Receiving Prospects Almost No One Is Talking About (Part 2)
stjosephpost
stjosephpost

In Part 1, I looked at the first half of a list of underappreciated 2014 WR prospects, basically a whole bunch of guys from small schools who put up 1000-10 performances in their final collegiate seasons. Why the 1000-10 benchmark? I’ve found it useful in finding WRs who outperform their draft position. Often the 1000-10 benchmark is accompanied by a strong dominator rating, and that’s great. Sometimes it’s not, but that doesn’t bother me too much if other things look good. After all, late-round guys like Antonio BrownJohnny KnoxDenarius Moore, and Julian Edelman—not to mention undrafted guys like Wes Welker and maybe even Davone Bess—still have their uses. For more detail, see Part 1.

So far I’ve looked at the Honorable Mentions, the FBS WRs, and the Big and Highly Productive WRs. Here are the remaining WRs, for the most part a lot of smaller WRs from small schools. Maybe one of them will be the next Donald Driver.

The Big and Adequately Productive WRs

These ten WRs all weigh at least 200 lbs and had DRs of at least 30% in their final college seasons:

Player

School

Year

Rec

Scr Yds

Scr TDs

Rtn TD

Tot TD

Tot MS%

Gms

Pro Rata Yards

Pro Rata TDs

Ht

Combine Wt

2014 Age

Gerald Ford

Valdosta State

2012

69

1026

13

0

13

34.01

13

NA

NA

75

220

??

Brendon Cunningham

Wittenberg

2013

63

1189

13

0

13

32.37

12

NA

NA

75

220

??

Deandre Cooper

Prairie View A&M

2013

80

1033

12

0

12

33.5

12

NA

NA

75

215

??

Justin Mello

New Hampshire

2013

73

1038

10

0

10

34.45

15

NA

NA

72

212

24

Brendon Foss

UMinn-Morris

2013

71

837

10

0

10

34.61

10

1004.4

12

76

210

??

Ray Ray Davis

Emporia State

2013

84

1064

16

0

16

35.83

11

1160.7

17.5

73

205

??

Robert Bleiler

East Stroudsburg (PA)

2013

71

1216

12

0

12

33.77

11

1326.5

13.1

73

205

??

Cameron Peavy

Texas Lutheran

2013

72

1089

13

0

13

39.49

9

1452

17.3

72

202

22

Caleb Holley

East Central

2013

55

970

9

0

9

36.61

10

1164

10.8

76

200

24

Gregory Moore

Lane (TN)

2013

59

910

11

0

11

34.41

10

1092

13.2

76

200

??

  • Ford has elite size, but he didn’t play at all in 2013, and I’m not sure why. I do know that he played in the 2014 NFLPA Collegiate and Medal of Honor Bowls.
  • Cunninghman, Cooper, Mello, Foss, Davis, Bleiler, Holley, and Moore all have size—but right now I don’t see much that distinguishes any of them from any of the others.
  • Of all these guys (at least as far as I can tell), the youngest is Peavy, who broke out in 2013 at the age of 21 with a strong 39.49 DR. Also, he’s Beyoncé’s cousin. That is in no way relevant to anything, but I couldn’t not mention it.

The Small but Highly Productive WRs

None of the players in the previous category are attending the combine, but of the eight players in this category two are at Indy this weekend. On the one hand, you have to applaud the NFL for inviting productive players to the Combine. On the other hand, you have to wonder why the NFL is looking at small players when larger players tend to have better careers. Whatever. These eight WRs all weigh under 200 lbs but had DRs of at least 40% in their final college seasons:

Player

School

Year

Rec

Scr Yds

Scr TDs

Rtn TD

Tot TD

Tot MS%

Gms

Pro Rata Yards

Pro Rata TDs

Ht

Combine Wt

2014 Age

James Long

UVA-Wise

2013

88

1384

10

2

12

60.32

11

1509.8

13.1

71

180

??

Zachary Pendleton

Jackson State

2013

53

1067

10

0

10

53.2

11

1164

10.9

75

190

??

Walter Powell

Murray State

2013

66

870

13

2

15

51.67

10

1044

18

71

189

23

Freddie Martino

North Greenville

2013

146

1689

12

0

12

51.17

11

1842.5

13.1

72

195

??

Jerry Rahill

Ursinus

2013

78

1074

9

0

9

48.99

10

1288.8

10.8

71

195

??

Robert Holland

Chowan

2013

92

1318

13

0

13

47.21

10

1581.6

15.6

74

190

??

John Brown

Pitt State (KS)

2013

61

1298

16

1

17

42.44

12

NA

NA

70

179

24

Lee Doss

Southern

2013

68

1080

10

0

10

40.41

11

1178.2

10.9

74

180

??

  • Long is totally Welker-esque in his size and return capabilities. When you put his outlandish 60.32 DR on top of that, you kind of have to wonder how he wasn’t invited to the combine.
  • Powell broke out as a junior with a 1200-12 season, and by DR he did even better in 2013. Over the last two years he has returned 1 kickoff and 3 punts for TDs. At his size, he’s basically an older Brandin Cooks. If he’s fast, he’ll be a guy to watch.
  • Martino has led D2’s North Greenville in receiving since his freshman year, and he first broke out with a 1000-yard season in 2011. In 2013, he broke the NCAA D2 seasonal reception record with 146. I wish he were bigger, but he’s about as legit as a D2 receiver can be. Of course, he wasn’t invited to the combine.
  • John Brown is small, but he intrigues me, and since he’s at the 2014 Combine we’ll very soon know how fast he is. A transfer from Mars Hill (where he broke out as an 18-year-old true freshman) and Coffeyville CC, Brown has been Pitt State’s offensive focal point ever since arriving on campus in 2011, breaking out once again as a 21-year-old with a 1200-12 receiving season supplemented with 3 RuTDs and 3 RetTDs. In 2012, he again led the team in receiving while chipping in over 200 rushing yards. With his return chops and offensive versatility, he feels like a discounted T.Y. Hilton.

The Small and Merely Adequately Productive WRs

With only three players in this group, what are the odds that one of them would be at the combine? Welcome to the NFL. These three WRs all weigh under 200 lbs but had DRs of at least 30% in their final college seasons:

Player

School

Year

Rec

Scr Yds

Scr TDs

Rtn TD

Tot TD

Tot MS%

Gms

Pro Rata Yards

Pro Rata TDs

Ht

Combine Wt

2014 Age

Matt Hazel

Coastal Carolina

2013

70

1015

10

0

10

32.72

14

NA

NA

73

198

??

Roman Wilson

Princeton

2013

86

974

13

0

13

36.01

10

1168.8

15.6

71

190

23

Grant Gellatly

Cornell

2013

91

1288

9

0

9

35.7

10

1545.6

10.8

70

196

??

  • Hazel has led Coastal Carolina in receiving each of the last three seasons. In 2013, he broke the school reception mark set by Jerome Simpson in 2013, finishing second to Simpson’s yardage mark of 1077. I don’t think Hazel is horrible, but his upside seems limited. He’s not all that big and productive. I’ll start to like him more if he submits a sub 4.5 40-time at the combine.
  • You know how some people think that Cornell’s Jeff Mathews could be a decent QB? Gellatly is the guy he was throwing to. Of the two, I prefer the WR.

So that’s the list. As pro days start and the draft approaches, keep your ear to the ground. Maybe you’ll be able to hear Barry Flynn (seriously, read Part 1) running his 40-yard dash in 4.5 seconds. For any of these single players, the odds that he’ll become a steady NFL contributor are strongly against him—but I bet that at least one player on this list of 30 players will have a top-30 receiving season within the next four years. Whoever he is, hopefully he’ll be on your team when he turns into 2009 Miles Austin.

recent and related...

in case you missed it...

Quick Hits – Dare Ogunbowale, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Maybe you’re a longstanding Ronald Jones truther. Perhaps you love the fact that Peyton Barber had a top-10 opportunity share among all NFL RBs last season and delivered only 9.4 fantasy points per game. If you are, or even if you’re not1 then it’s hard to get really excited about the

Read More

Why Buy Tarik Cohen When This RB is Cheaper?

“You pay for this, but they give you that.” That classic Neil Young lyric came to mind as I was researching this year’s “Why Buy?” series. We’re often so confident of what we’re going to get when we spend that sixth-round pick on the next big thing, but in reality,

Read More

Quick Hits – Mike Boone, Minnesota Vikings

There is a whole load of optimism surrounding Dalvin Cook ahead of the 2019 season. Gary Kubiak’s influence on the Vikings offense has long thought to be of benefit to Cook, relying as it does on zone blocking principles. The hiring of Kubiak, not to mention the overall desire to

Read More
Connect
Support

rotovizmain@gmail.com

Sign-up today for our free Premium Email subscription!

© 2019 RotoViz. All rights Reserved.