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Pre-Combine NFL Draft Prospect Rankings: No. 30 to No. 21

Over the last two months we’ve been working diligently to provide you, the readers, with as much actionable information as possible regarding the 2019 NFL Draft class. We’ve profiled over 40 prospects, providing the key advanced stats to know for each player and highlighting the strengths and weaknesses in their profiles.

What follows will be my initial set of rankings of the prospects we’ve written up. Click on the names for more detail. If you notice someone missing, don’t worry. We’ll continue providing content up to and beyond the draft in April. If you have any comments or questions regarding these rankings, feel free to hit me up on twitter at @jhoover9787.

Be sure to check out the rest of the rankings:

No. 30 – Drew Lock, QB, Missouri

Lock has the size that most NFL evaluators covet. He also has a tremendous statistical season on his resume, tossing 43 touchdowns in 2017. But questions about his poor play against SEC competition remain. It’s not hard to imagine a QB-needy team drafting Lock much earlier than we expect.

No. 29 – KeeSean Johnson, WR, Fresno State

One of the most consistent WRs in college football over the last four seasons, Johnson’s lack of national exposure could be his biggest liability. A strong combine performance would do wonders for his draft stock, but either way, Johnson is an intriguing later-round rookie pick.

No. 28 – Darwin Thompson, RB, Utah State

Multiple sources tout Thompson’s elite athleticism but with just one season of proven production at the FBS level, playing primarily against Group of Five defenses, concerns remain about his competition-adjusted production profile. If he meets the expectations at his pro day he could get drafted earlier than expected to a team looking for an explosive and elusive RB with proven pass-catching chops.

No. 27 – Emanuel Hall, WR, Missouri

Hall is an incredibly explosive athlete averaging 20.8 yards per reception for his career. On the other hand, he has just 97 receptions in four seasons and lacks an all-important breakout season. I’m not entirely sold on his viability at the next level but I do expect him to run well at the combine which should bump him up draft boards, increasing his chances for success.

No. 26 – David Sills V, WR, West Virginia

Sills’ TD production is absolutely incredible. But because of a circuitous career journey his advanced breakout age drags him down in some of our models. A full and fair evaluation of Sills requires nuance, as well as data we don’t yet have, primarily draft position. The range of potential outcomes for Sills at the next level is wide.

No. 25 – Irv Smith Jr., TE, Alabama

Smith had just 14 receptions in his first two seasons but blossomed as a part of Alabama’s offensive renaissance in 2018. Scouts believe he has the requisite athleticism to do damage at the next level and he’s still a relatively young prospect. The 2019 TE class is deep but Smith belongs in the top-tier discussion.

No. 24 – Deebo Samuel, WR, South Carolina

Samuel is a relatively old prospect who has dealt with injuries for a large portion of his college career. He did register a breakout season in 2018, but at age 23, it’s not quite as impressive as it seems. One positive note is that he’s been dynamic in the return game which is a positive indicator of future fantasy success. Samuel is one of the biggest mysteries in this class, in my opinion.

No. 23 – Marquise Brown, WR, Oklahoma

An electrifying athlete with the ball in his hands, Brown exploded over the last two seasons playing with Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray. But questions still remain as a relatively old prospect without a true breakout season on his resume. If he turns in a really strong 40-yard dash at the combine he could sneak into the top-50-pick range which would boost his outlook.

No. 22 – T.J. Hockenson, TE, Iowa

Shipped straight through the TE pipeline from Iowa City, Hockenson has rocketed up draft boards over the last few months. Not only did he out-produce his more notable teammate Noah Fant in 2018, but he’s widely considered to be a tremendous blocker as well. Rookie TEs almost never make an immediate fantasy impact, but Hockenson’s well-rounded game increase his chances for immediate playing time.

No. 21 – Dwayne Haskins, QB, Ohio State

Haskins re-wrote the Big Ten record books in 2018, finishing second in the Heisman Trophy voting to Kyler Murray. At 6-foot-3, 220 pounds, he has the frame that a lot of NFL scouts believe is necessary for lasting success. And as one of the younger prospects in the 2018 QB class, he profiles as a viable fantasy asset who will likely benefit from an early first-round draft slot. In 2QB and Superflex dynasty leagues, Haskins is a borderline first-round rookie pick.

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