Putting 2019 in Context: The Middle Rounds Still Belong to Wide Receivers
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Image Credit: Steven King/Icon Sportswire. Pictured: D.J. Moore.

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In Part 1 of this series, we looked at the performance of running backs who were drafted in Rounds 3 through 6 of best ball drafts — also known as the “RB Dead Zone” — and found that the 2019 group scored 29.2% more fantasy points than the 2015-18 average. However, despite posting such high point totals, the average win rate for these RBs was just 7.8%. How is it possible that these RBs posted such a pedestrian average win rate even though they scored so many points?

In this article, we’ll examine the flip side of the coin — wide receivers — to answer that question and discuss how you should leverage all of this information in your 2020 best ball drafts.

How did the Rounds 3-6 wide receivers do in 2019?

In a word: amazing. Chris Godwin’s 16.2% win rate was third among all WRs and ninth among all players. Ten of the 23 wideouts in this range posted a win rate above 10.0%, and 14 of 23 had an above-expectation win rate. Eight of the 12 WR1s were drafted here. For reference, just five of the 19 RBs drafted in Rounds 3-6 had a win rate of 10.0%, seven of them were above-expectation, and five RB1s were found here. The average PPR output of these WRs was 187.6 and the average win rate was 9.1%, both of which easily surpassed the respective value for RBs.

How do the Rounds 3-6 wide receivers usually do?

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